Free Webinar: “Introduction to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome” by Dr. Brad Tinkle – Recording Available

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brad-tinkle

Dr. Brad Tinkle presents “Introduction to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome”.

 

Sponsored by www.bodysupportstore.com 

 

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 Click here for the recording of this presentation

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About our speaker:  Dr. Brad Tinkle

– Brad T. Tinkle, M.D., Ph.D., is the Medical Director of Clinical Genetics at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Chicagoland.
– His clinics include Ehlers-Danlos (for adults, children, and families) and pediatric Down’s Syndrome.
– Prior to his current position, Dr. Tinkle was a clinical and clinical molecular geneticist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC).
– He specializes in caring for individuals with heritable connective tissue disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and achondroplasia among the many.
– Dr. Tinkle served as director of the Skeletal Dysplasia Center (CCHMC), co-director of the Marfan/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome clinic, as well as director of the Connective Tissue Clinic.
– He serves as associate director in the Clinical Molecular Genetics Laboratory at CCHMC.
– Brad T. Tinkle, M.D formerly served on the Board of Directors and on the Professional Advisory Network of the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation.
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Education
– Dr. Tinkle earned a bachelor’s in science for engineering (BSE) in genetic engineering from Purdue University in 1989.
– He received his Ph.D. in Human Genetics from the George Washington University in the District of Columbia in 1995.
– Brad T. Tinkle, M.D attended medical school at Indiana University and completed a pediatric/clinical genetics residency at CCHMC.
– He also finished a fellowship in clinical molecular genetics at CCHMC following residency.
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We appreciate your Likes and Comments
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  • Deborah

    WoooHoooo! I can’t wait!

  • Kathleen Bremer

    Please enroll me for email updates/info!

    Thank you!

  • Invisible Pain

    I must confess I was a little disappointed by this presentation. Dr. Tinkle was one of the first people I read when I was learning about JHS/EDS and I highly respect his knowledge and authority. But all the illustrations in this presentation depicted extreme cases of joint hypermobility. I think this reinforces for many ill-informed health care professionals that only circus freaks suffer; that unless a patient scores 9/9 on the Brighton, they’re not afflicted. Connective tissue damage and deterioration can happen on a much more subtle scale, too, but this tends to get overlooked because the extreme cases are more “interesting” to look at. By the time one reaches my (middle) age, much of the obvious hypermobility is gone, but the pain and damage remain forever. I don’t see myself in most of the case studies and photos around the web — only the extreme examples are shown. One need only look around the web to see the stereotype propagated again and again, and I believe this contributes to why so many of the rest of us go undiagnosed for so long. It’s up to the leaders in this field to help correct the misinformation.

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